F1 Safety Concerns

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Jules Bianchi's accident that took place during the Japanese Grand Prix on Sunday, which left the 25 year old Frenchman with "a diffuse axonal injury", has raised questions about what went wrong and what could have been done differently. Many are already asking the Japanese Grand Prix organisers why the race did not stop during bad weather condition.

Many think the cars need a roof to protect the drivers instead of them relying on a helmet to protect them from such accidents.

Formula One is praying that Bianchi recovers, as Brazilian driver Felipe Massa did in Hungary a few years ago when he was struck on his helmet by a spring shed from another race car.

In such issues, there is a lot of explaining to do, despite a lot of effort to cut down danger. The last time a fatal crash was recorded in Formula One was 20 years ago.

Max Mosley, the former International Automobile Federation (FIA) president who was played a key role to improve safety of Formula One, after the death of Ayrton Senna in 1994, feels what happened in Japan to the Frenchman was a freak accident. He says nobody can be blamed or pointed out for this accident.

The FIA had said in a statement, that the marshals in Japan had displayed a double waved yellow flag before the corner where the 25 year old Bianchi lost control of his car, to warn the drivers about Sauber's Adrian Sutil's crash.

Double waved yellow flags are a warning signal drivers to slow down and be prepared to stop. Chances are that Bianchi had not noticed the warning flag due to poor visibility in bad weather.

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